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There’s a Scientific Reason Behind Why You Shouldn’t Worry So Much About First Impressions

Most people put a great deal of stock into first impressions. Whether you are going to a job interview, going on a first date, or the first day of school, you worry about the first impression that you make on others. After all, people say that first impressions are everything. The truth is, you shouldn’t worry too much about first impressions.

It’s All About The Way You Perceive The Situation

A group of scientists wanted to learn more about first impressions, so they conducted a study. During this study, they compared how the subjects viewed themselves in a social situation versus the way the people they met viewed them. The study found that many of the subjects thought that they made a horrible first impression when in reality, the participants liked one another after the first encounter.

Holding a Conversation

In today’s technological world, people are having traditional conversations less and less. Rather than having a conversation, people are sending text messages, direct messages, and emails. When it comes to first impressions, this is a problem. To make a good first impression, you need to be able to hold a conversation. During the study, researchers found that the more conversations the subjects had with one another, the more they liked each other. Asking questions, listening, and talking about yourself are all key to making a good first impression.

You Are Your Own Worst Enemy

By nature, we are harder on ourselves than we should be. As a defense mechanism, we prepare ourselves for a bad first impression. This is known as being a self-protecting pessimist. The study found that most of the participants were sure that they made a bad first impression, only to find out that it was all in their heads. The key to making a good first impression is to put all of your insecurities out of your mind and try to enjoy meeting new people.

Trying Too Hard

The one issue that many of the test subjects had was that they were trying too hard. This is a common problem when people are trying to make a good first impression. Talking too much was the most common problem for most of the subjects. People get nervous, and they tend to ramble on. If the subjects weren’t trying too hard to make a first impression, this wouldn’t have been an issue. Another common problem for the subjects was bragging. Some would try to make a good first impression by embellishing on their accomplishments in life. This doesn’t make a good first impression. Instead, it turns people off. If you put too much stock into making a good first impression and you try too hard, it will backfire on you.

The final result of the study showed that first impressions are more important to the individual rather than the people that they are meeting. If you are meeting someone for the first time and you are trying to make a good first impression, you should first understand this. The person you are meeting is also trying to make a good first impression on you. This should help you to relax a bit knowing that you aren’t the only one in the hot seat. The study performed proves that you shouldn’t worry so much about making a good first impression. The best way to make a good first impression is to relax, be yourself, and don’t put so much stock into what people think. Even if you make a poor first impression, you can always make a good second impression.

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From Jail to Harvard: The Inspiring Journey of Aurora Sky Castner

Shannon Jackson

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Imagine being born in a place where hope seems distant, and then, years later, finding yourself on the path to one of the most prestigious universities in the world. This is the story of Aurora Sky Castner, a remarkable young woman from Texas, who has done just that. Aurora was born in Galveston County Jail but didn’t let her challenging start define her future. Now, she’s heading to Harvard University to study law, after finishing third in her class at Conroe High School.

Aurora’s life changed significantly after her birth in jail. Her father, stepping in as a single parent, picked her up from the jail and raised her on his own, as Aurora had no connection with her mother. Growing up in Montgomery County, Aurora moved around but stayed in the area, showing resilience and adaptability from a young age.

Teachers early on spotted Aurora’s potential. In elementary school, she was paired with a mentor, Mona Hamby, through the CISD’s project mentor program. Mona learned about Aurora’s interests and values from a simple piece of paper that included her admiration for Rosa Parks, her love for Dairy Queen tacos, and her passion for reading. This paper was a window into Aurora’s bright and curious mind, which Mona still treasures.

Mona Hamby didn’t just assist Aurora with academics; she was there for personal milestones too, like choosing glasses and getting haircuts. These moments were crucial building blocks in Aurora’s life, teaching her valuable lessons outside the classroom. Aurora appreciates every experience, acknowledging the importance of both the hardships and the guidance she received from Mona.

The decision to attend Harvard became clear to Aurora after a visit to the campus with Mona and her husband, Randy, in March 2022. The visit, which was meant to explore the university, ended up cementing Aurora’s desire to study there. Her excitement and determination only grew stronger after the trip, as noted by Mona.

Aurora’s journey to Harvard was not just supported by Mona but also by James Wallace, a professor at Boston University. He played a crucial role in helping her craft her application essay, which began with the powerful statement, “I was born in prison.” This sentence alone captures the essence of Aurora’s story—overcoming adversity and rewriting her destiny.

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Kindness in the Sky: Flight Attendant and Passengers Save Flamingo Eggs

Renee Yates

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In August 2023, a heartwarming story unfolded aboard an Alaska Airlines flight from Atlanta to Seattle, where a flight attendant and compassionate passengers came together to save six precious flamingo eggs. The eggs were being transported by a Woodland Park Zoo keeper from Atlanta to Seattle in a portable incubator, but midway through the flight, the incubator malfunctioned, putting the eggs at risk.

When the zookeeper sought help from the flight attendant, named May, she sprang into action. May quickly gathered rubber gloves and filled them with warm water, creating a makeshift nest to keep the eggs warm. Passengers nearby also offered their coats and scarves to help maintain the eggs’ temperature. May monitored the eggs throughout the flight, replacing the gloves with new warm ones as needed.

Thanks to May’s quick thinking and the kindness of the passengers, the flamingo eggs survived the journey. Joanna Klass, a Woodland Park Zoo animal care manager, expressed gratitude for the creative solution that ensured the safe transport of the eggs.

The six flamingo chicks hatched at the Woodland Park Zoo in September, marking a significant milestone as the first Chilean flamingo chicks to hatch at the zoo since 2016. Following their hatching, the chicks were carefully hand-raised by expert bird keepers, who fed them and took them on daily walks for exercise.

Months later, May received a special invitation from the zoo to meet the flamingos she had helped save and to name one of them. She chose to name the male flamingo “Sunny,” in honor of her newborn granddaughter. The other five flamingos were named Bernardo, Magdalena, Amaya, Rosales, and Gonzo, bringing a heartwarming conclusion to a remarkable story of compassion and cooperation.

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Cambodian Entrepreneur Transforms Plastic Waste into Brooms

Kelly Taylor

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In Cambodia, a man named Has Kea has found a creative way to tackle plastic pollution. He recycles tons of plastic into brooms, helping his community and the environment.

Every day, the city where Has lives produces up to 38,000 tonnes of waste. To reduce this, Has collects plastic strips from empty bottles. He bundles these strips on a machine, softens them in hot water, and slices them evenly. Then, he sews them with metal wires onto bamboo sticks.

The result is a sturdy broom that doesn’t easily break. Suon Kosal, a 26-year-old monk, bought 80 of these brooms for his temple. He appreciates that they help reduce pollution and encourage people to collect plastic bottles. By selling these bottles to Has, they can earn more money for a better living.

Has Kea’s innovative idea not only cleans up the environment but also creates economic opportunities for people in his community. His story shows that with creativity and determination, we can find solutions to big problems like plastic pollution.

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New Kiwi Hospital in New Zealand’s Bay of Islands

Shannon Jackson

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New Zealand, known for its stunning landscapes and unique wildlife, is home to the kiwi, a flightless bird and the country’s national icon. The kiwi is a curious and endearing bird, with a long, slender beak, soft brown feathers, and a round body.

In rural Kerikeri, a new kiwi hospital has been established by the conservation group Kiwi Coast to care for injured kiwi. This hospital is a vital addition to the region, as the kiwi population is on the rise in areas where communities are actively engaged in intensive pest control efforts.

Andrew Mentor, the coordinator of Kiwi Coast, explained that the increasing kiwi population is a positive sign but has led to more injured birds. These injuries often occur due to interactions with dogs, cars, and ponds. Currently, injured kiwi are taken to the Bird Recovery Centre in Whangārei for treatment and recovery. However, the long travel time to the centre adds extra stress to the already ailing birds.

The new kiwi hospital, built on land provided by a local farmer in cooperation with Puketotara Landcare and local hapū Te Whiu, features nine pens, each equipped with a nesting box and native ferns and grasses. Additionally, a clinic with three brood boxes is available for quarantine and intensive care.

The hospital anticipates receiving kiwi in need of care due to factors like drought, climate change, or attacks by dogs or feral cats. Being able to stabilize and rehabilitate these birds locally will greatly reduce stress and improve their chances of recovery.

The establishment of a dedicated kiwi hospital in the Bay of Islands is a significant step forward in conservation efforts. As a stronghold for kiwi, this region will likely see more kiwi and, consequently, more incidents requiring rehabilitation. Having a local facility will ensure that injured kiwi receive prompt and effective care, ultimately contributing to the preservation of this iconic species.

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Heroic K9 Biza Saves the Day in Freezing Cold

Kevin Wells

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In a remarkable story of bravery and skill, a K9 police dog named Biza became a hero in Auburn, Massachusetts. Biza, a female German Shepherd with the Auburn Police Department, played a crucial role in finding a 12-year-old who went missing in the freezing cold weather.

The adventure began late at night, around 10:30 PM, when the young child left home without their mother’s permission and no way to contact anyone. With the temperatures dropping and concern growing, the police were called in to help find the missing youth.

Enter K9 Biza and her handler, Auburn Police Officer David Ljunggren. Together, they set out into the cold night with one mission: to bring the child back home safely. Biza, with her keen sense of smell, was given something to sniff to pick up the child’s scent. Before long, she was on the trail.

Imagine trekking through the night, following a determined dog who is your guide, your hope. Biza tracked the scent for over two miles, leading the officers through the dark. Her training and instincts were put to the test, and she passed with flying colors. The officers found evidence along the way that the child had passed by there not too long ago, thanks to Biza’s incredible nose.

Finally, Biza’s hard work paid off. With additional officers joining the search in the area Biza had led them to, the missing child was found a short time later. Thanks to Biza and the police team’s efforts, the story had a happy ending, with the child being safely located and returned home.

Deputy Chief Richard Mills of the Auburn Police had high praise for Biza, saying, “Biza is a good dog.” This simple statement speaks volumes about the trust and bond between K9 units and their handlers, and the incredible work they do together.

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