Connect with us

Culture

“Superhero of the homeless!” Chants in Santiago describe real-life Batman that gives food to the homeless

Unlike the fictional city of Gotham, the streets of Santiago are very real, but running in the dark, and fighting hunger is a true life superhero with the face of the Dark Knight, Batman. 

Now he doesn’t ride a Batmobil or know the first thing about Brazilian jujitsu, but he does his best in making life better for the homeless on the streets of Santiago by bringing them food on a regular basis. He doesn’t solve crime or own any special combat gadgets, but he protects the homeless civilians from the villain of hunger and malnutrition.  

With his Batmobil-esque SUV, he rides around the city distributing hot meals in his impressive costume- a cape and two masks, one with the typical bat ears and eye slots, and other for protection from the Coronavirus (even the fictional batman wasn’t immune to viral diseases. So yeah, this one had to protect himself.)

The self-proclaimed “Solidarity Batman” is contributing his quota in making lockdown and the wave of the pandemic less agonizing for individuals on the streets, and we must say that he is doing a hell of a job. Many of his beneficiaries have only good things to say about him, and are super grateful for his selfless acts of benevolence.  

Just like Bruce Wayne, this Batman knows his way around words, and he sure drops a few words of motivation, humor, and affection to people alongside giving them food. 

What a guy! 

He fills their stomachs, and gives them words of hope? If we didn’t know better, we would be clamoring for the Avengers to consider him joining their team- Captain America certainly needs some real competition in motivational speaking. 

According to him, Batman was the perfect superhero for his mission, as he represents community unity, and is loved by the people. 

“Look around you, see if you can dedicate a little time, a little food, a little shelter, a word sometimes of encouragement to those who need it,” he said in an interview. 

Just like most masked superheroes, Santiago’s Caped Crusader prefers to keep his identity unknown. But his face doesn’t matter, does it? His good works already paint him as a beacon of hope and the world would be a better place if there were more of him running around.  

ADVERTISEMENT

Culture

The Amazingly Odd Things Americans Do

Renee Yates

Published

on

The U.S. as a nation literally represents a melting pot of cultures, behaviors, norms, beliefs and people. As a result, it is quite possible to travel a couple hundred miles or even just a few city blocks and be surrounded by an entirely different aspect of life, people and practices. However, there are still quirks and behaviorisms that, despite centuries of immigration into the country, make Americans extremely unique compared to the rest of the world. And those are not automatically led by the automatic zeal of democratic freedom and similar grand statements either. In fact, many are very mundane but stand out immediately when seen in other countries as Americans travel. Here are 30 unique habits, behaviors, norms or ideas we take for granted, but raise eyebrows elsewhere:

Continue Reading

Culture

New Discovery Reveals Old People Are Now Stronger When Compared To Those Who Lived In 1990

Kevin Wells

Published

on

A new study from Finland has looked into the probability of older people of this current time being more stronger and vibrant compared to people of the same age 30 years ago.

Quite strange, given that life expectancy becomes lower each year yet this finding was made possible from a study carried out at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland.

The research looked into the mental and physical abilities of Finnish people between the age of 75 and 80 to people of the same age in the 1990s.

“Performance-based measurements describe how older people manage in their daily life, and at the same time, the measurements reflect one’s functional age,” says the principal investigator of the study, Professor Taina Rantanen, in a statement.

It was discovered men and women that fell into these ages had faster walking pace, improved reasoning and muscle strength plus their working memory are much better than people of the same age born earlier.

These differences were not however noticeable in lung function tests.

“Higher physical activity and increased body size explained the better walking speed and muscle strength among the later-born cohort,” says doctoral student Kaisa Koivunen, “whereas the most important underlying factor behind the cohort differences in cognitive performance was longer education.”

Postdoctoral researcher Matti Munukka added, “The cohort of 75- and 80-year-olds born later has grown up and lived in a different world than did their counterparts born three decades ago. There have been many favorable changes.

“These include better nutrition and hygiene, improvements in health care and the school system, better accessibility to education and improved working life.”

The findings revealed longevity is supported by an increased number of years in lived with satisfactory functional strength in old age. This could justify why there’s been a slower rate of change as we advance in age.

“This research is unique because there are only a few studies in the world that have compared performance-based maximum measures between people of the same age in different historical times,” says Rantanen.

“The results suggest that our understanding of older age is old-fashioned. From an aging researcher’s point of view, more years are added to midlife, and not so much to the utmost end of life. That’s hopeful news for us all.”

Continue Reading

Culture

10-year-old metal detectorist discovers ancient sword on his first trip

Kevin Wells

Published

on

On trying out his metal detector, a gift for his 10th birthday, Fionntan has discovered a rusty sword that is believed to be centuries old.

The boy from Ulster, Northern Ireland found the sword on his very first try of the metal detector, and antique experts believe that the sword is from the 18th century- about 300 years old. 

“What a fine thing to find,” said Philip Spooner, a veteran antique dealer of 30 years. 

“The sword is a basket hilt-type sword as used by English officers and dragoons from about 1720 to 1780, or it could be a Scottish basket hilt of about 1700 to 1850.”

Mark and David Hawkins are brother antique experts with more than 55 years of experience between them, and they claimed that results from assessing the sword from pictures may not all that be correct because the sword was so rusty. 

In their assessment, they said, “We think it is likely an English basket-hilted broadsword, with flattened bars and large, plum pudding pommel- typical of the early types.”

Fionntan’s Dad has made contact with Dr. Greer Ramsey, a curator of archaeology at National Museums Northern Ireland to help in solving the mystery of the sword’s origin and exactly how old it is. 

Continue Reading

Culture

These Common Household Items Are Worth A Fortune

Kelly Taylor

Published

on

Ever bought an item years ago and time passed and it lost usefulness?

Many of us have these items we no longer make use of. Ranging from gifts we got from events to stuff given from friends. Some we touched or used for a while. Others were rarely opened and ended up in a place we now call basement or storage for some.

What we don’t know is these items — gadgets, appliances, toys have accumulated in value. Contrary to the belief of depreciation when an item isn’t used, nostalgia for electronics has made these products rank up in value.

And these items can fetch us a few bucks. You’ll surely be amazed you own a few of the products on the list.

Continue Reading

Culture

Copenhagen becomes the site of the world’s first ever “Museum of Happiness”

Renee Yates

Published

on

There are a lot of words that describe the year 2020, but “happiness” is probably not one of them. The wave of the Coronavirus pandemic came with a lot of tension, fear, anxiety, death, and restrictions. The year also saw the rise of many societal, security, and political issues that further aggravated the pain and bad ambience that had enveloped the world. Even though the situation is getting a lot better than it used to be, the year 2020 is still not a year to be remembered for jolly and merry. 

Denmark is often regarded as one of the happiest countries in the world, so it shouldn’t really come as a surprise that Copenhagen, capital of Denmark is home to the world’s first ever museum of happiness. The opening of this grand museum established by The Happiness Research Institute was not so grand- it was done as a low-key thing most likely in accordance with social distancing regulations in July. 

The institute lives to carry out findings about positive mental health and quality of life, and the museum is just a piece of their jigsaw. 

“Our hope is guests will leave a little wiser, a little happier, and a little more motivated to make the world a better place,” says Meik Wiking, CEO of The Happiness Research Institute. “We think Denmark is an obvious home for a museum that focuses on how we create a better framework for good lives.”

Happiness is an abstract, subjective, and quite complex feeling, which makes it difficult to represent in a glass case. However, the museum’s eight rooms does the trick by using interactive pieces that explore happiness from various angles and in different contexts. This covers a wide range of perspectives that satisfies the criteria for which the site was created- to make people happy and feel better about themselves. 

The Politics of Happiness room takes a deep dive into the misconception of an inseparable connection between wealth and happiness, with a speech from John F. Kennedy playing a pivotal role in that- while the Happiness Around the World room is covered in scribbles of happy memories of visitors. 

Sometimes, the pieces take a bold approach by asking sensitive emotional and ethical questions. “Can you and would you buy happiness?” “And would you actually return a lost wallet you found on the floor?” These questions have a way of making people reflect on their inner selves, and even discover aspects that they didn’t even know existed before. At the end of the day, people feel better about themselves, and feel more in control of their situations and actions. 

Other rooms in this one-of-a-kind museum include the science, history, and geography of happiness, which “retrofits” everything happy and exciting about these disciplines including emotionally intelligent AI and a world map displaying the world’s happiest countries by rank. 

Just like every other establishment in the world, the museum has a very strict Covid-19 protocol, so only 50 guests are allowed to be in the museum at once. 

Continue Reading
ADVERTISEMENT

Trending